Uurimus
Põlvkondade eluteed 79
Alguse aeg
Lõpu aeg
Staatus
SPSS fail
Uurimisobjekt
Eeskiri
Realiseerumine
The fourth stage of our longitudinal research was carried out in 1979 when most of the subjects were 30 or 31 years old. It consisted of the 1966 graduates of secondary general education schools with Estonian as the language of instruction. In order to get a clearer picture of this type of youth's self-determination we excluded from this aggregate subjects who had graduated from evening schools. On the other hand, we included in our last survey an additional group of those 1966 graduates whom we had never examined. As a result, our final survey covered 1,460 subjects or 43 % of 1966 full-time secondary school graduates of general education with Estonian as the language of instruction. Among the respondents there were 1,150 people whom we had examined during our initial survey in 1966.
Küsitlusmeetod
Kodeerimisjuhend
Välis_ID
79010217
Lühikirjeldus
The Estonian Longitudinal Survey (ELS) actually began in 1966 when Mikk Titma conducted the first stage of survey on a cohort of Estonian Young people, who were at that time eighteen-years-old students in their last year of Estonian-language general secondary school. Titma last interviewed these respondents in 1979. Working with an international team of researchers, Titma administered another round of the ELS between February and July 1991, while, at this stage, expanding the survey's scope. Following overview describes the specific methodology of the 1991 ELS, including the instrument and sample designs, the field procedures, and the characteristics of the respondents. The fourth stage of our longitudinal research was carried out in 1979 when most of the subjects were 30 or 31 years old. It consisted of the 1966 graduates of secondary general education schools with Estonian as the language of instruction. In order to get a clearer picture of this type of youth's self-determination we excluded from this aggregate subjects who had graduated from evening schools. On the other hand, we included in our last survey an additional group of those 1966 graduates whom we had never examined. As a result, our final survey covered 1,460 subjects or 43 % of 1966 full-time secondary school graduates of general education with Estonian as the language of instruction. Among the respondents there were 1,150 people whom we had examined during our initial survey in 1966.

UURINGUGA SEOTUD ISIKUD:
Titma Mikk

UURINGUGA SEOTUD INSTITUTSIOONID:
TÜ Sotsioloogiaosakond